Copyright April M Rimpo

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Friday, April 17, 2015

And the Excitement Begins, a 24" X 18" fluid acrylic

And the Excitement Begins by April M Rimpo

And Let the Excitement Begin
Fluid Acrylic
24" X 18" 
Mounted on 2" deep cradled wood panel
$1175

In And Let the Excitement Begin the lighted billboards in Time Square are the real stars. They tell you at a glance where you are, but what would Time Square be without the people? They communicate the fascination the world has with the city and the excitement it delivers. Many of the people are simply silhouettes since their presence is what counts; some show a bit more with the goal of showing something about our times. Some people are dressed up for the theater; others are casually dressed and appear to be out to just take in the event called "New York City." 


I love painting light and shadow to catch a moment of time, but I also love to include people in paintings.  They help me tell the story of a place and times. I generally don't know the people and am not striving to make them recognizable. It is their posture and what they are doing that is important to the story.

Some say paintings with people won't sell.  
I find that hard to believe.  I frequently notice paintings in a variety of public places that have people in them.  And what about famous artists like Winslow Homer? He frequently included people in his work.  His motivation was also to tell their story. Perhaps this is why I so love his art.


In fact, many workshops are given on the topic of including people in the landscape. The workshop descriptions often say something like, "Improve your landscapes with figures that engage the view and create a personal involvement in your painting."  

What do you think about paintings with people? Do you like them or not? I'd love to hear your thoughts.

2 comments:

  1. They are perfect in an urban setting, but I tend to avoid people in landscapes as they draw the eye too much.

    This is a super painting!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Interesting distinction. I do occasionally put a tiny figure in a landscape, but generally not. That wasn't a conscious decision but now that you mention it I must have had the same feeling. Thanks, Rolina. Glad you like the painting. I did this painting right after the 30 day challenge, starting with the runny drips and then adding the city on top. I like the added texture. I've done that with a few paintings and like the look.

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I look forward to hearing from you. - April

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