Copyright April M Rimpo

Visit April's website www.amrart.org
Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

"Traffic Jam II" 12" X 20" acrylic

Traffic Jam II by April M Rimpo
Traffic Jam II
Acrylic
12" X 20" X 1.5" deep gallery wrapped*
$600

Traffic Jam II is a second nod to Flam, Norway, where the ferry boats take travelers from near and far on a beautiful trip through a fjord. This tiny town must survive on tourists since the primary traffic we saw was the ships waiting to take us on a wonderful adventure. What a beautiful place.

The four houses you see along the water's edge are typical of what we saw in Norway. Red houses nestled on green covered mountains, with a few neighbors who chose the second favorite color, golden yellow.

The mountainside was truly the bright yellow green of Spring. I decided to feature that color by using a tertiary triad of color that included leaf green, cobalt aqua, and mauve. The mauve is a mixture of Permanent Alizarin and Phthalo Blue. I started the distant trees using Mat Acrylic Medium Gel to build up some textures then applied several variations of color from the triad to the medium while it was still partially wet.  Once dry, I used fluid acrylics for the balance of the painting, working back over the thicker background to create soft color variations in the shadowed side of the mountain.

I find that this combination of soft acrylic with fluid acrylics creates great depth to a painting, making it fun to visually explore.

* The image is painted around the edge of the canvas, so no frame is required.


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Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

"Gothic Pinnacles" a 20" X 16" Watercolor

Gothic Pinnacles by April M Rimpo
Gothic Pinnacles
Watercolor
20" X 16" image
$960

It's been awhile since I shared the colors and steps used to create a painting, so let's do it. I end this blog post on the architecture.

The Paints (pigment codes):
I used lavender/violet-yellow complements to create this painting. Complements tend to attract my eye and this particular set of colors conveys a happy feeling to a finished painting. The cool lavender and violet colors were used for the shadowed side of the building, while yellows were used in areas more brightly lit by the sun. 


Daniel Smith Extra Fine Watercolors – New Gamboge (PY153)
Winsor and Newton Artist Water Colour – Yellow Ochre (PY43)
Daniel Smith Quinacridone Coral
American Journey Artists’ Watercolor Royal Amethyst (Dioxazine) (PV23)
Holbein Artists’ Watercolor Cerulean Blue (PB35)
Daniel Smith Indigo (PB60, PBk 6)
I prefer to work with paints that have a single pigment in them. It is easier to avoid dull, lusterless colors, which watercolor painters call "mud". This small set of pigments allows me to create a pretty wide range of colors. You might not expect the green in the evergreen trees to be created from the same pigments used in the buildings, but they are. 

To make the building and trees feel like they belonged to the same paintings, I included some of these same greens in the shadow areas of the building and in the dark window panes.I also added violet colors into tree highlights. Artists call this "bouncing the colors" to create color harmony.

A few of the steps
In this section I'm featuring the windows in the foreground because I think they work well to illustrate the gradual layering to build color in the architectural details.  
Palest colors on left windows and begining of darks on 3rd
Initially my goal was to establish the pale colors in the lighter areas of the window. This includes the whites and yellow of the scroll work and the pinks in the lattice work in the windows. The left two windows show the first layer of color. In the window on the right, I added darks to see how the lattice in the windows worked once the darks were added. This is typical in my work.  Shifting back and forth between painting lights and darks makes sure the value range is right.


Light grays in scroll work on 1st and 3rd windows
This second photo shows the gray shadows in the upper scroll work in the far left window. You can see I was working quite gradually on the scroll work making sure the shapes were accurate. The window on the right has the darkest darks added to the scroll work, giving a nice 3-D effect. The windows all have their first layer of dark allowing a lot of the pastel colors to show through.


Darks on All Windows
In this photo, the darks in the scroll work are done, but the darks in the windows need to get darker before the painting is finished. I stopped working on these windows here until the painting was nearly complete so I can compare them with my darkest darks in the painting.



Close-up of finished windows.

After finishing all the spires, the windows in the distant building, and the tree, I decided the window panes in the front needed to be darker and more neutral in color. The earlier shade was more blue/violet. I added the dark colors from the tree to the darkest areas of these windows. The green neutralized the violet and also helped integrate the green into the building, albeit in a subtle way. 

I hope this explanation helps. If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask in a comment below.  

The Architecture
Here is an excerpt from section on Pinnacles on the Washington National Cathedral website https://cathedral.org/what-to-see/exterior/pinnacles/
A pinnacle is an architectural ornament originally forming the cap or crown of a buttress or small turret, but afterward used on parapets at the corners of towers and in many other situations. The pinnacle looks like a small spire. In addition to adding to the loftiness and verticality of the structure, the pinnacles are very heavy and enable the flying buttresses to counteract the weight of the vaulted ceiling and roof. By adding compressive stress (a result of the pinnacle weight), the building’s load is shifted downward rather than sideways.
Finials are the topmost portion of a pinnacle, often sculpted as a leaf-like ornament with an upright stem and a cluster of crockets. Crockets are projected pieces of carved stone that decorate the sloping ridges of pinnacles. The carved shapes of these elements help move rainwater down while keeping the water from the roof or walls. 
The website article goes on to discuss the damage from the 2011 earthquake on the East Coast and reconstruction efforts.

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Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

"Double Lagoon", a watercolor miniature

Double Lagoon 6.5" x 8.5" wood frame by April M Rimpo

Double Lagoon 1.3" X 3.6" image by April M Rimpo



Double Lagoon
Watercolor
1.3" X 3.6" image
6.5" x8.5" frame
$150





HorseSpirit Arts Gallery
8090 Main Street
Ellicott City, MD 
Phone: 410-461- 4505

Click here to Contact April

Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Monday, July 24, 2017

"Galactic Light" an 8" x 8" fluid acrylic on gallery wrapped paper

Galactic Light by April M Rimpo
Galactic Light
Fluid Acrylic
8" X 8" gallery wrapped paper, varnished
SOLD

This painting started as an abstract I created by applying some tiny splashes a masking fluid on the paper. Once dry I sprayed the paper with water so form interesting nooks and crannies of water but leaving a some areas dry so there would be some white of the paper remaining. The next step was to apply a couple of very watered down paints using pipettes. I sprayed the paint to make it spread and tipped the paper to let it run and blend.  Once dry I removed the mask to reveal all the tiny dots of white left behind. 

My first thought was how much it reminded me of a very dark sky where you can see parts of the Milky Way. If you've ever been lucky enough to be in a dark sky area you will first be mesmerized by the sky; I find it nearly impossible to stop staring into space. But once you "come back to earth" you will notice how your surrounding glow from the incredible light coming from the unpolluted sky.

I decided to add the tall cliff with lit trees at the top to represent the glow. My goal was to increase the majesty of the sky by using the scale of the cliff to the trees to give the illusion that the cliffs were huge.

If this peeks your interest about dark skies you can read more about them at the International Dark Skies website.


Click here to Contact April

Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.



Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Traffic Jam III, 3" X 24" fluid acrylic

Traffic Jam III by April M Rimpo
Traffic Jam
Fluid Acrylic
3" X 24" image
$275

My inspiration started in Amsterdam. Bikes raced along the bike lanes, which were typically wider than pedestrian sidewalks, running parallel to most roads. When crossing a street you had to remember not only to check the roads for traffic but also a final check of the bike lanes before getting to the sidewalk. The traffic in the bike lanes often moved much faster than car traffic and were actually the trickiest part of the crossing.

However any time you have a lot of traffic there are traffic jams during "rush hour." It was no different for the cyclists in Amsterdam. This painting, was the result of traveling by a long line of bikes that were stopped waiting for a light change to cross the car traffic. I had fun, adding in one person who actually turned around because she knew she had some time to wait.

This wide but short format was fun to try out. I see more in this format in my future.




Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Sunday, July 9, 2017

"Follow Your Dreams" 16" X 7" Fluid Acrylic

“New Orleans is the only place I know of where you ask a little kid what he wants to be and instead of saying, I want to be a policeman, or I want to be a fireman, he says, I want to be a musician.” – Alan Jaffe, Jazz Musician and Founder of Preservation Hall
Follow Your Dreams
by April M Rimpo



Follow Your Dreams
16" X 7" 
Fluid Acrylic

$380 plus shipping

I think the quote from Alan Jaffe says it all about this painting.  This young man was high school age, playing in the streets of New Orleans during the French Quarter Jazz Fest. 

We saw street musicians from barely ten years old up to very accomplished masters, who added to the "official" music of Jazz Fest. The area in Jackson Square, just outside one of the official stadiums of the Fest, seemed like a favorite spot. Three kids, ranging from 10 - early teens sat down next to us one day, placed their plastic buckets upside down in front of them, and drummed away for the public.  They were really good.  I didn't photograph them, but will never forget them. 

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Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.


Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Friday, July 7, 2017

"Together" 20" X 16" fluid acrylic

Together by April M Rimpo


Together
Fluid Acrylic
20" X 16" image
in 26" x 23" brushed silver frame

$775

Available for Purchase Now

There were lots of people out on the fishing wharf, but this man and his son were the ones to catch my eye. They had found a quiet spot where they were essentially fishing alone. It looked like this little boy was anxious to join in with his Dad. The water in the Gulf of Mexico was rough that day, due to the wind, but the temperatures were warm and the breeze felt good.  I find I can nearly transport myself back in time when I paint, the memories are that clear. I hope this scene brings back your own memories of a day by the water. I'd love to hear your thoughts.

Click here to Contact April

Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.
#hocoarts #hocoartist #fishing #wharf #galveston #gufofmexico

Thursday, July 6, 2017

"The Bakery" 24" X 24" Fluid Acrylic

The Bakery by April M Rimpo
The Bakery was the result of a trip to the Hudson River Valley. My husband and I wandered around though the towns of the valley for several days enjoying the sights, food and wine.  While there we had to stop at the Culinary Institute of America have lunch in one of their restaurants and wander around outside on a lovely fall day. We also stopped in their cafe which had this bakery that served wonderful snacks and coffees.  I was drawn to all the activity in the bakery and found I could take some nice reference photos through their bakery window. When working on such a busy scene you really have to pick and chose what you want to include to get a feel for the busy atmosphere but not have a painting that is so overwhelming that you don't know where to look. 

The Bakery
Fluid Acrylic
24" X 24" image
$1395
31.5" X 31.5" brushed silver frame

Selected for the Pennsylvania Watercolor Society's
38th Annual International Juried Exhibition

I liked weaving lavender colors through the bakery to offset all the warm colors of the breads and wooden shelves. I think they also provided a nice way to include a sense of depth to the scene.

Generally I start most of my paintings working the full sheet as a unit and maybe toward the end I work final details one section at a time. However on some paintings I feel I need to work section by section from the start nearly to completion before moving on.  The Bakery was one of these paintings.  Perhaps because there was so much detail of the figures, bread, shiny reflective appliances in the bakery that I felt I have to pay attention to details nearly from the start.

When I work this way, I really have to pay attention to keeping a consistent feel throughout the painting and work so there are still restful areas that don't detract for the whole of the painting.  The images of some of the earlier steps of the painting are shown in earlier blog post to give you a sense of how it developed. I provided links to these other posts below.

At the end I needed to work around the whole painting to either subdue or enhance areas to make The Bakery hold together as one.
Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.

Copyright April M Rimpo 2016 All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

#aprilmrimpoart
#hocoart, #hocoarts

Monday, July 3, 2017

Des Colores: Movement III 18" X 24" Fluid Acrylic

Movement III by April M Rimpo
Movement III
Fluid Acrylic
18" X 24" image
$1035

I love color.  That doesn't mean I don't think the lights and darks (value range) of a painting aren't still the most important part of making a painting work, but the colors can really make a painting sing.

Last year I experimented with a number of color combinations described in a book by Stephen Quiller, Color Choices: Making Color Sense Out Of Color Theory. This painting shows one combination that really appealed to me and I have now used several times: Lime Green, Orange, and Purple. Yes, there are touches of Pthalo blue as well, but it was used to create the Lime Green, so leaving a little of it felt right in this painting. There is not enough to alter the primary color combination I chose to use. 

Here are a couple other paintings where I used the same Lime Green, Orange, and Purple combination.

Cycling
Floral Wonderland
Sunset
Dancers
Shadows on the Path
Country II
Chicadee

Other paintings of cyclists
Movement Series
Cycling and Race


Click here to Contact April

Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Saturday, July 1, 2017

25th Annual Colored Pencil Society of America International Exhibition


The Mansion at Strathmore in North Bethesda, Maryland is hosting the Color Pencil Society of America International Exhibition through August 6, 2017. There are pieces by 119 artists on display throughout the mansion. The artists are from across the United States and from Australia, Greece, Hong Kong, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, and Spain. 


Side Street by Katherine Thomas
I went with a fellow artist who also wanted to see this exhibit.  While driving there, I mentioned a pencil artist who I hoped had a piece in the exhibit because I think her work is so magnificent. When we entered the first room of the exhibit, there was her piece, Side Street. I couldn't have been happier. Having only seen her work online, it was fantastic to see it in person.  I was so pleased to see that it was even nicer than I imagined. My image (at right) does not do it justice. 

I was happy to see that another artist friend, Deborah Maklowski, is also included in this exhibit. In fact, I had recently seen her demonstrate colored pencil at a gallery where we both have work for sale. I believe her piece is the only abstract in the exhibit. The form and colors were magnificent and can't wait to talk to her about it.
Adrenaline by Jesse Lane


We wandered through the exhibit for nearly two hours stopping and examining the wide variety of subjects and techniques used by these artists. Some are huge and we wondered how many months they took to complete. Others are much smaller gems, done with such a delicate touch - conveying a soft, quiet beauty. Some used techniques we have never seen before and left us guessing how they were created.  

These artists also provided us with smiles or outright laughter through their titles. One depicts a hummingbird, all fluffed up and perched below an icicle. It is titled, "Shoulda Listened to Rufous, Thought Anna." 

As you can see, we were not the only people stopping and discussing the amazing pencil drawings in this exhibition. Adrenaline may have been the largest piece on display. The water splashes surrounding the man were frozen in space and time. 

These boys were actively engaged in the exhibit, while they wandered through with their mother. It was great to see such a young audience as mesmerized as we were.


Having done colored pencil work in my twenties I was in awe of the talent shown here. Some used the type of pencil stroke that I learned but others used such a light touch and smooth drawing surface that you couldn't see any strokes at all. If someone had told me they were air brushed paintings I would have believed them.

Enjoy the images I've shared here, but these barely scratch the surface of what you will see at this exhibit. If you can, you should make your way to see it yourself.







TheBachelorPad by MarshaGilger
 


Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

"Free Living" 20"X16" Fluid Acrylic

“A part of New Orleans’ beauty is that she is a place where many people, stifled elsewhere, feel safe to be themselves:
 just safe to be." 
  
Quo Vadis Gex Breaux, New Orleans What Can’t Be Lost, 2010
Free Living by April M Rimpo
Free Living
Fluid Acrylic
20" X 16" with brushed silver frame
$840

Free Living is a bit of the parade held in the French Quarter for the opening of Jazz Fest 2017. I've always been intrigued by pointillist paintings from the time of the Impressionists, although I never expected to create one.  Painting thousands of dots didn't seem like something I'd ever want to do. 

Well I didn't paint thousands of dots but I did use masking liquid to create all these dots.  My process was to mask some dots before painting, do a light wash, mask some more dots, paint some more, mask some more, paint a bunch of darks to see where I stood, remove the masking, then paint many more layers to push the other people in the parade into the background while painting my focal point woman to completion.

I love the final look and now appreciate even more what the pointillists did. I still can't imagine painting an entire painting with dots, but can say they were really onto an amazing something. The energy in this painting is really captivating for me and I hope for you too.



Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Friday, June 23, 2017

"Time at the Bus Stop" fluid acrylic 12" X 12"

Time at the Bus Stop by April M Rimpo
Time at the Bus Stop
Fluid Acrylic
12" X 12" in brushed silver frame
$425
Time at the Bus Stop portrays a family having a few moments to talk and catch up while waiting for their ride. The morning light causes wonderful highlights and long shadows that caught my eye. As I was painting the family I couldn't help but wonder where they were headed.  Are the boys on their way to school? Is this a family outing? I decided your context heavily influences how each of us perceives the scene. Perhaps they are really headed to the fields to work. 

But in reality their destination doesn't matter. What inspired me to paint this family is the interactions between them. The young mother seemed to be listening closely to her youngest son, while the older boy looked on while eating some breakfast. I suspect the oldest woman may have been the grandmother who appears to be a bit lost in thought. It was catching that happy moment in time that compelled me to paint. I hope my painting makes you smile.

Click here to Contact April

Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.

Copyright April M Rimpo 2016 All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

"Mississippi River" Fluid Acrylic Triptych 2' X 6'

Mississippi River by April M Rimpo (Click on the image to see it larger)
Mississippi River
Fluid Acrylic Triptych
24" X 72"

$3880
Contact April Regarding Purchase


I remember as a young teen being aware of how badly our environment was suffering from various pollutants: in the water, on the ground, in the air. Our family had a small power boat and would occasionally go on the Connecticut River and my father would pull my brother and I with the boat, while standing on a wide board designed for "surfing". It was great fun, but I remember how badly the water smelled and how I couldn't wait to get home to shower afterwards. 

It was not many years later when new laws required major cleanup of our waterways and reductions of the pollutants spewed into the air. When I was in my late teens the problem of DDT impacting the strength of eagle eggs was in the news along with worries about the fate of our National Bird. DDT was a commonly-used pesticide for insect control in the United States until it was banned in 1972 by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Now we see so many EPA regulations being canceled and I worry about the fate of our planet.

A recent trip to New Orleans was a subject of great inspiration. The music, the food, the art were all so beautiful and such a joy to experience. However, we also took a ferry boat cruise on the Mississippi and when it neared the delta we began to see huge refineries along the river. The shift in sceneries from the beauty of the region to these refineries was startling. I had been thinking about doing a painting about protecting our environment for an upcoming juried exhibit, titled Art of Engagement

When I saw the refineries I knew what I wanted to paint. For me it brought to mind the question of whether our country was abandoning alternate fuel initiatives and ignoring the problems of too much carbon monoxide emissions. How much will the corporations and states decide to honor our planet and do their best to continue to reduce emissions? So far many States have stood up for the Paris Agreement, so time will tell. 

I found this quote by Edward Abbey and decided it was time for me to create this painting. These words may have been written about 50 years ago, but maybe even more true today.
“It is no longer sufficient to describe the world of nature. The point is to defend it.”  
See more about the creation of this painting here.


Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

American Glass Now: 2017 at the Washington National Cathedral

On Saturday, June 17th, I visited the American Glass Guild's exhibit titled, American Glass Now: 2017 held at the Washington National Cathedral. I attended with my husband and a long-time friend who is a fellow glass enthusiast. 

I haven't created many fused glass pieces in the last couple years, so I was surprised to learn how popular painted glass currently is in the American Glass Guild.  Several pieces were painted glass and few combined fused glass and painted glass techniques. The assortment of pieces both in subject and technique were fun to see.

Of course the National Cathedral is a place of wonder as well. Wonderfully carved limestone, flying buttresses, and gothic spires galore. We also strolled through the Bishop's Garden to round out the day.



This exhibit runs through September 8, 2017.

The artists with work on display include: Alice Johnson, Troy Moody, Kathy Barnard, Linda Lichtman, Nancy Nicholson, Tim Carey, Ellen Mandelbam, Richard Prigg, Marie Foucalt-Phipps, Staphane Ruault, Mary Clerkin Higgins, Sean Merchant, and Amy Valuck.



To learn more about the American Glass Guild visit
www.americanglassguild.org.


Washington National Cathedral
visit www.cathedral.org for visiting hours.




In the image at right are the pieces by Tim Carey (upper left), Marie Foucault-Phipps (right), and Kathy Barnard (lower left.)





Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.

Friday, June 16, 2017

Great Watermedia Resources

In today's blog I thought I would share some art sites that I have found helpful and how they will be useful to you too.  I've added a few new resources to the list.

50 Best Blogs for Watercolor  - I've just discovered this one and am still reviewing it.  I'm sure it will take a while to get through the contents and appears to contain a wealth of helpful information. Provided by Web Design Schools Guide.
  • 10 links to watercolor demonstrations
  • 20 links to watercolor artist's sites
  • 10 links to art business sites
  • 10 links to art news and reviews
There is one art business blog that I just have to add ArtsyShark. In addition to great art business advice they feature artists a few times each week.

One watercolor book that is published annually by North Light is Splash. I always look forward to seeing it and have purchased a copy the last few years. Splash 16: Exploring Textures has just been released and is sure to be as amazing as ever.  

I also have to share a link to a new watercolor class by Deb Watson. Her new Pet Portraits in Watercolor class is available on Craftsy.  Be sure to also check out Deb Watson's website.

Helpful tips to help protect your data, be it written material, visual art, or other forms of art, in Vimeo by Kathryn Goldman

Color Theory and Harmonies - Nice definitions of different color schemes 
In the same vein, a site I like for exploring color schemes is Paletton.com's Color Scheme Designer, which is intended for web designers but works great for visual artists too.

You can read a summary evaluation of a wide variety of watercolor paint manufacturers in a blog on WonderStreet.com's blog, Which Brand of Watercolour Should You Use.

Updated: June 2017 

Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.

Copyright April M Rimpo

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