Copyright April M Rimpo

Visit April's website www.amrart.org
Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Thursday, February 6, 2020

Looking Back - Watercolor on 10" X 10" Aquabord


Looking Back a 10" X 10" Watercolor on Aquabord
by April M Rimpo
Looking Back
Watercolor on Aquabord
10" X 10"
Varnished and in a Black Wood Floater Frame


Looking Back is inspired by the Arizona Living Pioneer Museum in Pioneer, AZ. The museum has changed drastically since I took this photo. We were there in the 1980s when I remember only a single museum building with no one dressed in historic clothing.  I'm not sure if all of this equipment is still scattered behind what was the main museum building. Nothing like capturing the history of a history museum. You know I love capturing light in my photos. We must have been there mid-day and the intense Arizona sun poured down on this old equipment creating a great contrast between the tops of things, such as the seats and wheels, with dark shadow essentially everywhere else.  Of course, rust also turns quite dark over time, looking nearly black, but you can still see here and there the burnt orange color of rust.
I was particularly enthralled with the small distant building and had to include that since it was so vivid in my memory. We never knew the story behind that building.


Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.


Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Monday, November 18, 2019

"Nature's Paintbrush" watercolor on Aquabord by Ampersand, 12" X 12"

Nature's Paintbrush, watercolor by April M Rimpo
Nature's Paintbrush
Watercolor on Aquabord
Varnished and Framed in Black Wood Floater Frame


I love the effects of nature and time on things around us. They take items made by man and turn them into beautiful glistening objects. Perhaps no longer functional for their original purpose, but they tell a story of their time in the world. I captured this moment in the journey of the bucket and can of nails, but no doubt not the end of their life; nature isn't finished with them.



Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Thursday, October 31, 2019

My Experience with Watercolor Canvas Panels



All Tied Up
Watercolor on Watercolor Canvas Board
16" X 20"

(A 1952 International Harvester Pickup Truck 
Entwined by Nature)

Every time I decide to try a new material, whether a new paint or a new platform to paint on, there is a time of adjustment when you are searching for techniques that work for the new materials. For the last week and a half I've been painting with watercolor paint on a Fredrix®  Watercolor Canvas Panel.  I've used watercolor canvas (not mounted on a panel) before and liked it when painting with fluid acrylic.  I found I could work pretty much in the same manner as when painting on watercolor paper.  Unlike painting on traditional canvas, watercolor canvas is smoother and doesn't require you to apply an initial coat of paint to fill in the texture of the canvas.

I expected the watercolor canvas board to demonstrate the same smoothness but found it had a little bit more tooth or texture.  It was also more slippery, so when using dilute watercolor (i.e., pigment with a lot of water mixed in) it tended to remove the earlier layers of paint no matter how soft the brush and how lightly I pressed on the surface. I had to switch to using thicker applications of watercolor paint with very little water added to the paint. I could layer the thicker paint, using a light touch, and blend the new paint in with the earlier layers. Glazing thin washes didn't work.

As a watercolor artist that is used to applying thin glazes and gradually shifting to paints that have less water, I found it a bit uncomfortable using paint at a buttery consistency for most of the painting.  It felt much more like painting with oil paints, which I haven't done in 20+ years. I had to remember how to blend oil paints and use techniques much more like that. I reviewed information on https://fredrixartistcanvas.com and found out there is a lot of sizing on the canvas and if you wet and rub the canvas before starting to paint the "slipperiness" of the canvas is much reduced.  Of course it was too late to do that. Another tip was to apply and blend paint with the edge of the brush rather than the tip of the brush. I considered pulling out my fan brush for blending, but never did. 

"Scumbling" lighter color paint over darker passages, allowing the darker color to peek through the lighter passage became important for adding highlights; not something you do with watercolor since it is so transparent that you have to preserve light areas and not apply them at the end. 

The completed work is not transparent watercolor, so to make this painting come to life my focus was on color, light, and dark.

Comment to let me know if this painting brings back memories for you.   

Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

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