Copyright April M Rimpo

Visit April's website www.amrart.org
Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Thursday, October 31, 2019

My Experience with Watercolor Canvas Panels



All Tied Up
Watercolor on Watercolor Canvas Board
16" X 20"

(A 1952 International Harvester Pickup Truck 
Entwined by Nature)

Every time I decide to try a new material, whether a new paint or a new platform to paint on, there is a time of adjustment when you are searching for techniques that work for the new materials. For the last week and a half I've been painting with watercolor paint on a Fredrix®  Watercolor Canvas Panel.  I've used watercolor canvas (not mounted on a panel) before and liked it when painting with fluid acrylic.  I found I could work pretty much in the same manner as when painting on watercolor paper.  Unlike painting on traditional canvas, watercolor canvas is smoother and doesn't require you to apply an initial coat of paint to fill in the texture of the canvas.

I expected the watercolor canvas board to demonstrate the same smoothness but found it had a little bit more tooth or texture.  It was also more slippery, so when using dilute watercolor (i.e., pigment with a lot of water mixed in) it tended to remove the earlier layers of paint no matter how soft the brush and how lightly I pressed on the surface. I had to switch to using thicker applications of watercolor paint with very little water added to the paint. I could layer the thicker paint, using a light touch, and blend the new paint in with the earlier layers. Glazing thin washes didn't work.

As a watercolor artist that is used to applying thin glazes and gradually shifting to paints that have less water, I found it a bit uncomfortable using paint at a buttery consistency for most of the painting.  It felt much more like painting with oil paints, which I haven't done in 20+ years. I had to remember how to blend oil paints and use techniques much more like that. I reviewed information on https://fredrixartistcanvas.com and found out there is a lot of sizing on the canvas and if you wet and rub the canvas before starting to paint the "slipperiness" of the canvas is much reduced.  Of course it was too late to do that. Another tip was to apply and blend paint with the edge of the brush rather than the tip of the brush. I considered pulling out my fan brush for blending, but never did. 

"Scumbling" lighter color paint over darker passages, allowing the darker color to peek through the lighter passage became important for adding highlights; not something you do with watercolor since it is so transparent that you have to preserve light areas and not apply them at the end. 

The completed work is not transparent watercolor, so to make this painting come to life my focus was on color, light, and dark.

Comment to let me know if this painting brings back memories for you.   

Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

The Weather Held Out for the Plein Air Event

Just Past Dawn, fluid acrylic on 9"x12" canvas board
by April M Rimpo
Once a year the Columbia Art Center holds a Plein Air Event (paint out) in the Fall.  I love that this event is NOT in the middle of the summer like so many others. I dislike the heat of summer, so I don't consider participating in those events.  We had a tiny sprinkle of rain, but not enough to slow us down.  

Although I arrived thinking I would only do one painting then go home, I did bring a second surface in case I caught the bug and had to do another. I painted this year at Lake Kittimaqundi. The first was fluid acrylic on canvas board. I started it shortly after sunrise and was successful at keeping in mind how it looked at that moment even as the sky, water, and reflections continued to change while I painted.

When I did a plein air painting on Wilde Lake in 2017 I kept falling in love with every change of the reflections in the water and was unsuccessful in sticking to my plan.  I was still happy with the result, but it took much longer to finish that painting since I kept changing it.  You can change the water and not change other aspects of the painting since the sky affects the water reflections, so there is a big ripple effect each time you change the plan.

I scoped out where I wanted to paint a couple days before the event.  It was a gorgeous sunny day and I arrived at noon.  The light was quite different from the day of the event where we started with some blue sky in the east but gradually clouded over to a variety of gray clouds as the day progressed.  Because of the difference in time of day and light, the place I wanted to paint looked quite different, but the view across the lake was wonderful.


By the Foot Bridge, 8"x8" watercolor & fluid acrylic
 on Aquabord by April M Rimpo
The second spot I scoped out for a painting was just to the right of where I stood for the morning painting. All I did was pivot to my right and do the second painting.  It was a fantastic spot. 

For the first hour or so I was alone in that area, with the exception of a few walkers and runners who were enjoying the walking trail. I heard a few people talking who noticed me and recalled the plein air event was that day, but no one came over and talked to me.  Although I enjoyed chatting while painting in 2017, that morning had me so drawn into painting that I was glad to be left in peace to paint.

A couple other artists arrived later but they too were busy creating. It was a fantastic day to be outside, granted with a few extra layers of clothes since mid-October can be cool.  I surprised myself and really considered going out to paint again on Sunday when the day started out with bright sun.  It did turn to rain so I was glad I had not ventured out, but I definitely understand why so many artists do love painting outdoors rather than in the studio. 


Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.


Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Thursday, September 19, 2019

"Protectors" 24" X 12" Watercolor

Protectors Watercolor 24" X 12"
by April M Rimpo
Not far from Buckingham Palace in London, we saw these two on horseback. I assume they were part of the palace guards. It was after the celebration of the Queen's birthday, so it could have been some of those riding in the parade. This was the calm after the parade that contained lots of regalia. It must be the humidity in the air that made all the flowers and trees feel fresh and soft. It was a lovely place.

Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Saturday, September 14, 2019

11 days into a 30 day challenge

I found out about this challenge after the first 2 days were compete, so I've got 9 images for the first 11 days. Unlike painting a day challenges where you are supposed to finish a painting per day, in this the goal is simply to do something artistic each day.  No requirement to complete anything.  However, I've used this as an opportunity to complete a variety of small works with only two requiring two days. One had been started before the challenge, but wasn't very far along. I hope you enjoy the variety. I certainly have enjoyed bouncing around on subject matter. 


September 2019 - First 9 days of 28 day Creativity Challenge
  • Day 1 (for me) - Day's Journey - Watercolor - 14" X 11" 
  • Day 2 -  Beginning of Village by the Sea, started as a demo piece in a Fluid Acrylic workshop - 21" X 15" 
  • Day 3 - Village by the Sea, completed - Fluid Acrylic - 21" X 15"
  • Day 4 - Beginning of Family Ties - Watercolor - 7" X 5"
  • Day 5 - Mounted 3 watercolor paintings in preparation for varnishing
  • Day 6 - Sketch of Willow trees and swans - concept drawing for painting
  • Day 7 - Finished Family Ties - Watercolor - 7" X 5"
  • Day 8 - Flowers of Fall - Watercolor - 24" X 6"
  • Day 9 - Heading North - Watercolor - 4" X 4" X 2" block

I think my next painting will be a more typical larger painting that I might submit to an exhibition, if it comes out well enough.  We'll see what happens.


Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.


Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Thursday, September 5, 2019

Art Reception of Work by Students and Faculty at Columbia Art Center

Student/Faculty Show at Columbia Art Center

April's paintings included in this exhibit are:
Coming in for a Landing, Family Day, and A Cheery Place

Join me at the Opening Reception and Pot Luck on Sept 14, 2-4pm. On the evening of the reception there is an opportunity to vote on your favorite work. An award will be granted to the artist with the most votes. 

This exhibition celebrates the work of the Students of Columbia Art Center. Attend the reception and vote on your favorite student piece. 2-D and 3-D art will be on display. April plans to have 3 paintings representing her Fun with Fluid Acrylics classes taught earlier this year.


Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Sunday, August 25, 2019

"Two Birds in a Bush" a 8" X 8" fluid acrylic

Two Birds in a Bush by April M Rimpo, 8" X 8" fluid acrylic

I love watching birds in our yard. Golden finch males are always easy to spot since their golden yellow bodies just can't be camouflaged. For many years our Morning Glories manage to survive the winter and by mid-Summer are entwined on a trellis in our front yard.  Their variegated blooms from Lavender-Rose to deep purple always make me smile. Most mornings I look out first thing to see how many blooms are opening that day and hope I'll remember to look again mid-day when they truly are at their glory. 

Forgive me while I  have some fun twisting an old saying; You could have One painting in hand and "Two Birds in a Bush." 

This title came about when I asked my friends on Instagram and Facebook to offer suggestions for a title. I received over twenty responses, many of which will likely become titles of other paintings.  Your creativity was so appreciated.  I laughed when I read "Two Birds in a Bush" harkening back to the expression about cherishing what you have rather than risk losing it by trying to attain something better. That thought actually seems quite in line with my feeling about the moment I captured. For me this painting represents the beauty of nature and something to cherished.


Available at HorseSpirit Arts Gallery
8600 Foundry St Suite 2063, Savage, MD 20763
Phone: (301) 490-2001


Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Thursday, August 15, 2019

How Long Did It Take? - Answers to Consider

Metal Flashing Detail from By the Old Mill © 2019 April M Rimpo
Artists are often asked "How long did it take you to paint this?" Granted some take longer than others depending on a myriad of factors:

  • Even if you are working from your own source photos, there is often research needed about your subject to be able to create a good design.
  • Deciding on a color scheme - Color could be driven by the emotion you want to portray or could be influenced by a client's preferences. 
  • The amount of detail in the painting - applies to both realistic and non-objective work where details may be more in the realm of textures needed to communicate the thoughts and feelings behind the work.
  • In representational painting - the variety of materials you're simulating in your painting - such as metal, brick, cement, wood, glass, undergrowth in woods, rusted tools, a snarl of fallen trees, water, vines, a sprinkling of fallen leaves, pottery, delicate crystal, various types of fruit, clothes, crocheted items, intricate fabrics. The list is endless all requiring different approaches to creating them. 
  • How you plan to present the work - framed, gallery wrapped, varnished all require different considerations even before you start the painting.

Detail - Vines growing on brick,
and reflections in windows

© 2019 April M Rimpo
As a result, when asked this question, I may answer with a little bit about the process I used to create the painting, since I suspect that might be more what the person is curious about.  I don't mean a technical description full of words that are understood only by artists, but a more general description.  

I may also talk about the inspiration and what I had to do to be sure the story or emotion of the moment was captured in the painting.

I recently finished a painting with many details and a variety of materials simulated in the painting. As a result, this painting took much longer than many of my paintings, but is that really want you want to learn about the painting?  I don't think so. Much of the time was spent figuring out how to represent each of the materials. 

I've included some detail images of my painting, By the Old Mill, to let you see up close how different each of these sections are. Perhaps less obvious is how different the painting application is to create the look of metal versus brick and vines, water, detailed branches and the illusion of distant undergrowth in the wood.

Detail from By the Old Mill - A Snarl of Branches and Water © 2019 April M Rimpo
Detail - The Illusion of undergrowth in the woods 
© 2019 April M Rimpo

Those who read my newsletter got a sneak peek at the whole painting, but I'm not sharing it widely since I plan to include this painting in an upcoming feature of my work.

If you'd like to learn more, just ask.  

Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

"Transitions: A Self Portrait" Watercolor 16" X 16"

Transitions: A Self Portrait, a 16" X 16" watercolor

I've considered doing a self portrait for years. I wanted something that would represent my life from the early days through the present. Previously. I wasn't quite sure how to do that.  In this portrait, the ribbons represent phases of my story. I decided to use ribbons of history to capture memories about my life through the symbols on the ribbons, which you'll notice run over my head and make their way into me, depicted by the shapes on my face and neck.  

After finishing the painting, I decided one of the ribbons actually served a dual purpose since some of the shapes reminded me of hieroglyphics. I was always fascinated with the ancient Egyptians, doing a report on hieroglyphics in either the fifth or sixth grade. Later, I went on to study anthropology, including archaeology, ancient cultures and modern cultures, long before switching to a path in electrical engineering and semiconductor design, which was the original thought behind that ribbon. I won't share the meaning behind other ribbons so you can have your own interpretation.

Recently, I've created portraits where I want to capture more about the person than their image by using unusual colors and symbols to represent their life or how I interpret their inner being. Now I just need an opportunity for a photoshoot where I can capture a more dramatic shot than a typical family photo. 

Stay tuned for more of these portraits of life.


Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Friday, July 19, 2019

Collaboration with Musicians - Part III Bob Jacobson


Connecting © April M Rimpo

As part of my and Elaine Weiner-Reed's exhibit, Portraits of Life: The Art of Storytelling, we put out a call for musicians and writers to collaborate with us as part of our exhibit. We provided those who responded a series of images of our paintings. They then selected which ones they would write music or poetry to. 

Bob Jacobson remembers his first time improvising, at age fifteen, to the folk tune "Billy Boy." He's been playing improvised solos to jazz, R&B, rock, blues, and Latin tunes ever since. This was his first experience creating melodies and improvisations inspired by artwork, almost totally from scratch. 

Visiting New Orleans in May of 2018, which included playing on the streets of the French Quarter with two bands of seasoned local musicians, aided him in responding to the Preservation Hall piece, Showing Off II.
Showing Off II © April M Rimpo


Below is a link to a video I created from raw video photographed by my husband, Chas. 

I'm so thankful for this experience, which would have never happened if Elaine Weiner-Reed had not started her initiative "Every Painting is a Song."




Follow this link to see the video of Bob's performances to Connecting, which he played on the Saxophone, and Showing Off II, which he played on the clarinet.

Copyright of Text and Images of April M Rimpo Art held by April M Rimpo All images and content remain the property of the Artist. All Rights Reserved. You may share these videos with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.No reproductions or prints are authorized. All rights reserved.

Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.


Contact April and see more of her art on her website

You can also stay up to date with April M Rimpo art through Instagram @aprilrimpo -  Please join me.

Saturday, July 6, 2019

Collaboration with Musicians: Part II Gerald Richard Ingley

Part II  of April M Rimpo and Elaine Weiner-Reed's 
Collaboration with Musicians on May 22.

I know I keep saying this, but I am so grateful to Elaine Weiner-Reed for suggesting we continue her "Every Painting is a Song" initiative as part of our two-person exhibition, "Portraits of Life: The Art of Storytelling" at Bernice Kish Gallery in Slayton House. Having musicians improvise pieces to our work, create structured improvisations by a trio of classical musicians, or write lyrics and song was a mind blowing experience. 

Gerald (Jerry) Richard Ingley brought me to tears with his lyrics for Ruby and Bernie to my painting Venus & Mars. I didn't expect him to have time to also write the music, but he did do just that. I got to cry all over again when he sent us a recording of the song along with his thoughts on the piece.

Venus & Mars © April M Rimpo

Venus and Mars © April M Rimpo

Ruby and Bernie  Gerald Richard Ingley © 2019 Music, Lyrics and Vocals



About my painting Jerry said, "I used a personal experience as a basis for the lyrics after I'd studied the four people, the old guy with the ball cap and sandals standing near to but slightly apart from the woman with … a sweater … tied around her waist. The personal experience is evident in the lyrics, but the outcome of the real experience is … different from the storyline in the lyrics.”

For me Jerry's lyrics added depth to my painting that I makes me love the painting more than I already did.  Learning what others think when they see one of my paintings make the painting for me.  Everyone's different perspectives are joy for me to hear. Getting to also hear how my painting sounds through Jerry's song was a amazing experience that I'll never forget. 

Chance Encounters © Elaine Weiner-Reed

Chance Encounters © Elaine Weiner-Reed



Elaine Weiner-Reed   https://www.elaineweinerreed.com/



Read about Elaine's painting and hear Gerald Richard Ingley's Song 
"I Don't Want to See You Anymore" 
on Elaine's Website.


What do you think about the music and lyrics by Gerald Richard Ingley? Please share in the comments.  

I'm sure I will continue to collaborate with writers or every kind in my future exhibitions.  If one of my paintings every inspires you to create a poem, story, play, music, sculpture or an other form of art, please share it with me. Of course, if a painting brings back memories for you I'd love to hear those too. By sharing our thoughts and creative work we make the world a bit better.


Copyright of Text and Images of April M Rimpo Art held by April M Rimpo All images and content remain the property of the Artist. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright of Elaine Weiner-Reed artwork held by © 2019 Elaine Weiner-Reed (EWR) All images and content remain the property of the Artist.


Original songs by Gerald Richard Ingley (c)2019 Music and Lyrics


You may share these videos and April M Rimpo or Elaine Weiner-Reed's work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.No reproductions or prints are authorized. All rights reserved.


Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.



Contact April and see more of her art on her website

You can also stay up to date with April M Rimpo art through Instagram @aprilrimpo -  Please join me.

Thursday, July 4, 2019

"Wondering" 18" X 24" watercolor

"Wondering" 18" X 24" watercolor © April M Rimpo
Wondering is an exploration into telling a story, about a moment in a person's life and what I image may be her thought, through colors, lighting, and shapes. Leveraging full strength, non-representational, wet-into-wet watercolors for the shaded side of her face, I then juxtaposed this strength with very pale natural colored washes on the brightly lit side of her face. Hard lines add texture to her hair, along with a few touches of splatter, mimic the splatter that forms the feathers in her hair. The addition of some geometric shapes in her face, in the foreground and background contrast with highly organic blends surrounding her. These organic blends are repeated in the squares on the left side of the painting, serving as a means to pull together the organic and geometric contracts found elsewhere. 

I'm delighted that "Wondering" was selected by juror, Joseph Becherer, for the International Society of Experimental Artists International Exhibition. Joseph Becherer is the director of the Snite Museum of Art at the University of Notre Dame and formerly founding director and curator of the sculpture program at Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids, Michigan. This exhibit will run from September 7 - October 26, 2019. 

This painting is available on April's website, where you can see a larger image.

Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Tuesday, July 2, 2019

Black Swans 14" X 36" watercolor

Black Swan ©  2019 April M Rimpo
It seems like I photograph swans just about every time I see them, but think this is only the second time I've painting them.  The first time I was new to watercolor and they were white swans. This painting hides in our bedroom, since my painting ability has come a long way since it was created and I would never show it to others. As I recall I saw these black swans during a vacation to New Zealand. I'm not 100% sure of that, since I store my art reference photos separately without reference to the location, so it could have been elsewhere. I believe I also saw black swans in London and somewhere in the US, so who knows.

I find the black swan intriguing. As I painted the swan I realized there are a lot of pale colors nestled in and among the black feathers.  First I painted all their pale shades, so at one point they looked like they could be white swans. Later I added the dark feathers. I love how hints of the pastel colors show through. 

Interested in April's artwork or taking one of her classes? Consider becoming a Studio Friend by signing up for her twice-monthly email. April segments her newsletter so you can select topics you'd like to hear about when you sign up. For those who Select the General Interest topic you will receive emails about twice-monthly. If you are only interested in classes, then the emails will be much less frequent discussing upcoming classes and how to register. Select as many topics as sound of interest. Thank you for your support of April M Rimpo Art.

Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Saturday, June 15, 2019

Collaborating with Musicians - Part I ROGUE COLLECTIVE

First of all my thanks go to Elaine Weiner-Reed who conceived of "Every Painting is a Song" a few years ago and made it come to life in 2018 at her exhibition in Chaney Gallery at Maryland Hall. When Elaine and I joined forces for our exhibition "Portraits of Life: The Art of Storytelling", Elaine immediately suggested we continue her initiative of "Every Painting is a Song" as part of our exhibition. I wanted to expand on that idea to include "Every Painting is a Story." Having been in exhibits at the Columbia Art Center where either the artist created a painting to a poem or the poets wrote paintings to the visual art, I suggested we not only collaborate with musicians, but with poets as well.  

As a number of poets and musicians agreed to participate in our collaboration, we realized we needed two collaboration events: one Collaboration with the Written Word and one Collaboration with Musicians. This blog post focuses on the Collaboration with Musicians.

We were extremely lucky to have music created by ROGUE COLLECTIVE, Bob Jacobson, and Gerald (Jerry) Richard Ingley. This post is Part I of our Music Collaboration and features ROGUE COLLECTIVE. Enjoy this amazing group of women as they explore their reactions to painting and share what they hear in the pieces.

Meet the musicians of ROGUE COLLECTIVE and learn more at their website.


Alexa Cantalupo: Violinist | Musician | Creative Director of ROGUE COLLECTIVE - Bachelor of Music in Violin Performance from University of Maryland, 2019 Master of Arts in Arts Management from American University 
Kaitlin Moreno: Violinist | Musician | Professor - Performance degree from the University of Maryland. Kaitlin is dedicated to performing music of our time by collaborating with up-and-coming composers.
Natalie Spehar: Cellist | Composer | Lectures | Performs - Classical, Rock, and Folk Music. Natalie is a graduate of the Eastman School of Music and the University of Maryland.

Enjoy their amazing Structured Improvisations created by the three talented women of ROGUE COLLECTIVE and hear how they saw the paintings.

Time at the Bus Stop © April M Rimpo

Time at the Bus Stop © April M Rimpo
ROGUE COLLECTIVE's interpretation of Time at the Bus Stop (shared in the video below), so aligned with my thoughts on this painting that I now know how my thoughts sound. Just thinking about it makes me get the chills and tear up at the same time.  My thanks to ROGUE COLLECTIVE for letting me have this incredible experience.




In Her Own World © April M Rimpo


In Her Own World © April M Rimpo
Video of ROGUE COLLECTIVES Structured Improvisation of In Her Own World.


And this post would not be complete without ROGUE COLLECTIVES' amazing music inspired by Elaine Weiner-Reed's paintings.

Heart and Soul © Elaine Weiner-Reed

Heart and Soul © Elaine Weiner-Reed
Enjoy Elaine Weiner-Reed's video about this wonder musical creation by ROGUE COLLECTIVE based on her painting Heart and Soul. Also learn a bit about the three musicians that are the heart of this collective.


Come What May © Elaine Weiner-Reed

Come What May © Elaine Weiner-Reed






















Enjoy Elaine Weiner-Reed's video featuring ROGUE COLLECTIVE's music based on her  painting Come What May



Challenge Accepted © Elaine Weiner-Reed

Challenge Accepted © Elaine Weiner-Reed
And last but not least, Elaine's video honoring ROGUE COLLECTIVE's music created for Challenge Accepted.



Please share your comments on the art and these amazing musicians.

Copyright of Text and Images of April M Rimpo Art held by April M Rimpo All images and content remain the property of the Artist. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright of Elaine Weiner-Reed artwork held by © 2019 Elaine Weiner-Reed (EWR) All images and content remain the property of the Artist. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright of all music held by © 2019 ROGUE COLLECTIVE. All content is the property of the Artists. All Rights Reserved.

You may share this blog post with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited. No reproductions or prints are authorized. All rights reserved.



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