Copyright April M Rimpo

Visit April's website www.amrart.org
Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Friday, February 16, 2018

"The Firehouse" 14" X 11" Fluid Acrylic on Aquabord™


The Firehouse by April M Rimpo
The coming of fall is always a time to celebrate in paintings. Fall colors complement the brick and natural stone in Ellicott City.  The yellow building of The Firehouse Museum stands proud in this historic town.

When I decided to paint scenes from Ellicott City there was a wealth of material begging for attention.  The hard part was deciding what to paint first.

You can tell the people of Ellicott City love their town. The old town center is beautifully maintained and, as you can see in The Firehouse, American flags fly out front of several shops. 

Now a museum, the firehouse was first built in 1889 and was the first firehouse in Howard County. According to the Howard County website is was used after 1923 as a meeting hall, county office space, and a library. It is located at the intersection of Main Street and Church Road.


The Firehouse
Fluid Acrylic on Aquabord
14" X 11"
$375


Other paintings of Ellicott City can be found here:


Aquabord is a trademark of Ampersand

Thursday, February 8, 2018

"S-Curve Delivery" 16" X 20" Fluid Acrylic

"S-Curve Delivery" by April M Rimpo
We went to the mall to watch the ice skaters at the indoor rink. Looking down from the second floor gave us a great view of skaters young and old doing spins or just trying not to fall down. Then I looked straight down at the food stands and saw this. 

There was food on little plates going for their own spin on a conveyor belt that surrounded their food station and the tables where their customers took in all the options.

I'm not sure if it is the engineer in me that draws me to these or the artist, but I was fascinated by the concept and loved the curves in the conveyor belt that contrasted with all the linear patterns created by the floor tiles, tables, chairs, and counter space. Out came the camera to capture the scene below.

S-Curve Delivery
Fluid Acrylic
16" X 20"
$1120

Click here to Contact April

Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.


Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

A Presentation on "The Art and Science of Acceptance into Juried Shows"

A local fine arts association asked me to give a talk on getting into juried exhibitions. Some of their members were aware that my art has been selected into several National and International exhibits in the last several years.  

Many years ago I had taken a one-day workshop on the jurying process which included a panel of jurors who reviewed art provided by those present to select an imaginary exhibition.  Before they provided their selections they explained the jurying process, including the speed with which images are viewed.  Each image is seen only for a couple seconds, two or three times, while the selection is made. They presented the images to the audience just twice at the typical speed and asked us to select just 10 image to be included in a show.  Then each of the five jurors presented their choices.  It was easy to see that several of the jurors had a few of the same images in their selection. I was delighted that I had some of the same images.  This workshop taught me a few things:

  1. The selection process is very subjective (since each juror had different criteria they used to select the show), but most of them were looking for pieces they thought would make a cohesive show.
  2. There are some qualities in artwork that do cause people to pay attention and those pieces had a higher probability of being selected.
I went home feeling much better because I understood how many excellent pieces didn't make the cut and that you should not let a "not selected" decision make you stop entering exhibits.

As I've started to move from entering local exhibits to National and International exhibits, the number of entries and quality of entries has increased. Often jurors speak about their choices while providing some rules of thumb on what they look for. Over the years I've been able to learn what types of things make a difference. What are those qualities that make a piece stand out on the National scene.

Some of these are no surprise:
  • Your ability to technically handle your medium must be excellent. This will not guarantee your work will be selected, but if technique is lacking you will likely not be selected.
  • Your piece needs to have something unique that catches the juror's eye. Design, perspective, color choices, and high value contrast are some of the characteristics that will make a difference.   Every piece doesn't have to have all of these, but some combination that will make the judge think, "Hey that's different and I want to look at that some more."
  • Emotional content in the piece is another attribute that is hard to explain but can make a difference.  What I mean by this is that the painting is not just a pretty picture but it also says something: tells a story or makes a statement about something.
Samples of April M Rimpo paintings
selected for Major Art Exhibitions
Spend some time examining your own work to see which pieces have been selected for shows and which pieces have received awards.  This analysis doesn't have to take a lot of time, but will probably teach you a lot and help you focus on what you enter. If you haven't received awards, then spend some time looking at the pieces that did get awards and try to understand what made them stand out.  You may not like the work, but try to get to the essence of what may have made it special to the judge.  Whenever possible attend receptions to hear the juror speak; it will be informative. This doesn't mean you paint subjects you don't care about or change your style.  You have to paint what you love. 

In my talk I'll expand on these concepts and use my work to illustrate my point. I'll also discuss other aspects of entering exhibitions that might help you figure out the right exhibits for your work. Costs and time commitments will also be covered.  

Details on the date and location of this talk can be found here



Click here to Contact April

Interested in learning more about April's art inspirations, tips about her painting process, or art business tidbits? Want to know when her art is in exhibits? Consider joining her friends and collectors by signing up for her twice-monthly email.


Copyright April M Rimpo All Rights Reserved. You may share my work with attribution and a link to this source site, but all other uses are prohibited.

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